The Voyeur

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The Voyeur

18.00 58.00

100% Silk with multi-colored illustrative design.

In a city of unknowns, make sure you’re ready with a square that can bend to any occasion. Your ambitious taste and impeccable style are sure to attract the best of attention. Good luck out there. And remember: smile, hold your head high, and you’ll be surprised what you pull out of your pocket. 

Ships worldwide, hand delivered by butlers. Free returns*.

*NOTE: Sale items are final and not eligible for returns

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The Details:

  • Color: Blue
  • 100% Italian Silk
  • 13" x 13"
  • Designed in New York City
  • Made in Italy
  • Rolled hem

Customer Photos

Pocket squares are great conversation starters, and since our brand embodies adventure, we provide the story behind each design to supplement your first five minutes of conversation. So once people compliment you on your new square, you can thank them by sharing the adventure that led to its design.

The Voyeur

The Voyeur is meant to be a window into our own duality. Our lives by day are cautious, where our nights are daring. This can be exemplified most during prohibition, where a corrupt government and increased crime forced individuals to look within themselves to find right and wrong.

Organized crime received a major boost from Prohibition. Mafia groups limited their activities to prostitution, gambling, and theft until 1920, when organized bootlegging emerged in response to Prohibition. A profitable, often violent, black market for alcohol flourished. Powerful criminal organizations corrupted some law enforcement agencies, leading to racketeering. Prohibition provided a financial basis for organized crime to flourish.

We find one story of an adventurer stuck between right and wrong in Bill McCoy, an honest man who fell on hard times and worked his way into rum running. Capt. McCoy, a nondrinker who never touched liquor, considered himself an "honest lawbreaker." McCoy took pride in the fact that he never paid a cent to organized crime, politicians, or law enforcement for protection. Unlike many operations that illegally produced and smuggled alcohol for consumption during Prohibition, McCoy sold his merchandise unadulterated, uncut, and clean. He was an adventurer who broke the law with sound morals and ethics.

McCoy began to smuggle whisky into the U.S., traveling from Nassau and Bimini in the Bahamas to the east coast of the United States, spending most time dealing on "Rum Row" off Long Island. After a few successful trips smuggling liquor off the coast of the United States, Bill McCoy had enough money to buy the schooner Arethusa. Placing the schooner under British registry to avoid being subjected to U.S. law, Bill renamed the vessel Tomoka after the name of the river that runs through his hometown of Holly Hill.

On November 23, 1923, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Seneca had orders to capture Bill McCoy and the Tomoka, even if in international waters. Instead of a long drawn-out trial, Bill McCoy pleaded guilty and spent nine months in a New Jersey jail. He returned to Florida and invested his money in real estate. He and his brother continued the boat building business and frequently traveled up and down the coast.

Adventure puts us on many uncertain roads. The only thing we can do is look within ourselves and trust that deep down, we know which road to walk. 

Learn how to fold your pocket square.

Product Number: PV1C32D1

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